5 Amazing Travel Destinations Where Batman and Superman Movies Have Been Shot : Destinations, News

We are hoping that you have chosen a side already. And as far as we are concerned, we are on both the sides — be it Batman, or Superman. After all, both the superheroes have been making us dream for a better world since the time we were children. Also, they owe a lot for our entertainment as well. We have been smitten by every movie each of them has appeared in. But at the same time, there have been moments wherein we wished we could see how Gotham City or Smallville would look like in real life. We say, you can actually travel to those places. Skyscanner, a leading flight search portal, has come up with a list of such destinations.

With Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice hitting the screens today, let’s take a look at some of the most exciting destinations that have been used as filming locations for Batman and Superman movies over the years.

New York City

Picture courtesy: Reuters

Picture courtesy: Reuters

This city is home to architectures that are strikingly similar to what most of you have observed in Batman’s Gotham City or Superman’s Metropolis. Quite naturally, this city has been the filming location for both these fictional cities. So, the next time you travel to New York, you can pay more attention to the architecture. Some of the most popular tourist attractions in this place include the Central Park, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Empire State Building and the Statue of Liberty, among others.

Also read: 7 amazing locations from Game of Thrones

Chicago

Picture courtesy: Reuters

Picture courtesy: Reuters

If you have been ardent follower of Christopher Nolan’s versions of Batman and Superman movies, let us tell you that Chicago has been the setting for either of the cities. In both Batman Begins and The Dark Knight, parts of Chicago has been shown as Gotham City. Talking about Man of Steel, the city of Chicago has been portrayed as Metropolis. Chicago History Museum, the Museum of Contemporary Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago are great places to visit when you are there. In case you are a nature lover you must plan a trip to the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum.

Plano, Illinois

Picture courtesy: Flickr/David Wilson/Creative Commons

Picture courtesy: Flickr/David Wilson/Creative Commons

A Superman fan will take this place seriously. Well, Plano was the filming location for Smallville in Man of Steel — the place where Clark Kent spent his childhood. As a traveller, you would love this place because of its unparalleled natural beauty, that strikes a fine balance with a peace-loving countryside population. You can take a break from the hustle and bustle and relax in the serene surroundings of the Silver Springs State Park, which is home to the Silver Springs State Fish and Wildlife Area, or take a boat ride on the Fox River, or just spend some quiet time fishing, or just by hiking along the nature trail.

Also read: 5 gorgeous locations in New Zealand where Lord of the Rings was shot

Vancouver, British Columbia

Picture courtesy: Reuters

Picture courtesy: Reuters

If you loved Man of Steel, you would remember the famous oil rig sequence. Or even the bar where Superman worked. All of those scenes have been shot in Vancouver. When you are here, make sure you pay a visit to the Aquarium, which is the largest in Canada, with over 50,000 creatures and climb up the Capilano Suspension Bridge Park to enjoy breathtaking views of the city from the suspension bridge. Also, don’t forget to enjoy the Cliffwalk, which is a walk along a cliffside, way above the Capilano river.

Los Angeles

Picture courtesy: Reuters

PHOTOS: Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice review in pics

PHOTOS: Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice review in pics

  • Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice, Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review in pics, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review in picsNow it is officially the season of the mother. Two supermen clash in a $250 million fight, and the only hero is a woman in grey hair intermittently doing laundry and looking worried. You may cry for Diane Lane, but doing laundry may be about the only sane thing anyone does in this 153-minute mess where the most well-defined thing is Cavill’s chin cleft. Naah, Affleck’s lips are no competition.
    Read Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review: One and half stars
  • Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice, Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review in pics, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review in picsCavill, of course, is Superman, Affleck Batman. Stringing them along is Lex Luthor, played by Jesse Eisenberg, who has his own defining body part – his unkempt hair. There may have been an idea there to pit a Silicon Valley-like boy genius in tees against bulky men in tights, but Eisenberg hams his Zuckerbeg into this crazed incomprehensible figure with nervous tics and mumbled words that is a lifetime away from The Social Network.
    Read Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review: One and half stars
  • Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice, Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review in pics, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review in picsHowever, having a villain without any charisma or appeal is not the biggest problem with Dawn of Justice — that would be the reason Batman and Superman are fighting. A lot of words are thrown about, of “humans playing gods”, of “democracy being about conversation”, of “consent of the governed”, of “being all powerful means you can’t be all good” etc, etc. All of which logically should see Superman and Batman on the same side of the fence. The reason they decide that the other one is wrong is absolutely unclear, except for the fact that it gives a sexy title to this film. The way it gets all resolved is even funnier.
    Read Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review: One and half stars
  • Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice, Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review in pics, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review in picsAnother actor of note plodding away against his better self is Jeremy Irons, as Alfred. Replacing one Englishman for another turns out to be not the answer as Irons doesn’t have the wry self-humour or warmth required of that father figure to Batman. Irons is a hardened cynic, and you have other thoughts — none of them charitable — when he wonders whether Batman will ever have children. The only profession of note is journalism, as practised by Lois Lane (Adams) who, in the course of it, keeps needing Superman to rescue her. Much in the nature of Snyder’s other rushed, half-confused ideas, we constantly return to her paper, The Daily Planet, only to hear the editor say the newspaper business is worth nothing.
    Read Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review: One and half stars
  • Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice, Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review in pics, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review in picsHolly Hunter is a Senator who hangs around in hair even worse than Luthor, chairing hearings that summon Superman to account for, among other things, his acts in a village in Africa. It’s a wonder he understands — though the frown on Cavill’s forehead is as constant a cleft as on his chin — given how Hunter literally clenches her teeth while speaking.
    Read Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review: One and half stars
  • Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice, Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review in pics, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review in picsIt is clearer what the $250 million have been spent on. Hardly a scene passes than something not blow up, fall apart or gets shot down, even in dreams. Gal Gadot gets introduced as Wonder Woman while we get glimpses of other creatures in DC Comics’ world who are set to populate the screen in the coming years, in a universe presumably parallel to Marvel’s Avengers.
    Read Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review: One and half stars
  • Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice, Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review in pics, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review in picsBefore the end, just when you think it is all about to get over, another monster surfaces as Luthor messes about with genetics and a giant amniotic sac inside a kryptonite ship. Kryptonite, in fact, isn’t as rare as it used to be, almost everyone has a piece of it.
    Read Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review: One and half stars
  • Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice, Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review in pics, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review in picsCavill and Affleck, who sports grey sideburns to show an aged Batman, have little to do but grimace, straighten their shoulders and fight. Both get to appear shirtless, and while Affleck wins that one, pack for pack, at least Cavill is poaching eggs for Lane at the time. Batman has only giant computer screens for company, where he keeps searching for Russians and ‘White Portuguese’. And falling asleep very often, to dream some crazy dreams. Alfred doesn’t seem to notice this new predilection.
    Read Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review: One and half stars
  • Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice, Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice movie review in pics, Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice review in picsTo shore up its man vs god ideas, the film falls back on a giant statue of Superman that takes off from Michelangelo’s Creation of Adam, and lines up real-life scientists and commentators such as Neil degrasse Tyson and Andrew Sullivan. Alice in Wonderland gets referenced, as does The Wizard of Oz, in the strangest of ways. Supermen may need a bit of it all, but science, faith or fairy tale, nothing can rescue this one.

Ben Affleck on ‘Batman v Superman’: People Actually Like This Movie

Ben Affleck on ‘Batman v Superman’: People Actually Like This Movie

Ben Affleck on ‘Batman v Superman’: People Actually Like This Movie

GettyImages-516773808.jpg

FilmMagic

Batman v Superman officially opens in theaters today. After years of hype and a relentless marketing campaign, the anticipation for the movie deflated in the days before its release, with critics across the country hammering the film. As of Friday morning, the movie was sitting at a 30 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, a borderline disaster for a movie of this magnitude.

Ben Affleck may not be bearing the brunt of the criticism—by most accounts, he’s a solid Batman—but the dude certainly looks weary-as-hell while promoting this film. Last night, Affleck stopped by Jimmy Fallon’s Tonight Show, and spent most of his time playing with puppies and talking about Congolese coffee. Fallon, in a heroic attempt to kowtow to his guest, claimed the film was getting critical praise, and found two nice comments about Affleck amongst the horde of negative reviews. But even Affleck wasn’t hearing it, and adopted what seems to be the movie’s new party line.

“Please, don’t scare people into thinking this is a critical film,” Affleck said. “We’re not going for the film critics’ circle. This is an audience movie. People actually like this movie.”

Affleck certainly doesn’t have to worry about one thing: No one is scared about Dawn of Justice being a critical film. Will “the people” actually like the film? Early returns don’t seem to be great there either, although the movie is bound to make a ton of money its first couple weeks in theaters.

What Affleck should probably worry about: The Justice League movie, the first of two parts, begins filming on April 11. Affleck, who was on a hot streak of critically acclaimed, Oscar-baity films, is now stuck with the DC universe for at least two more films.

GettyImages-516773808.jpg

FilmMagic

Batman v Superman officially opens in theaters today. After years of hype and a relentless marketing campaign, the anticipation for the movie deflated in the days before its release, with critics across the country hammering the film. As of Friday morning, the movie was sitting at a 30 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, a borderline disaster for a movie of this magnitude.

Ben Affleck may not be bearing the brunt of the criticism—by most accounts, he’s a solid Batman—but the dude certainly looks weary-as-hell while promoting this film. Last night, Affleck stopped by Jimmy Fallon’s Tonight Show, and spent most of his time playing with puppies and talking about Congolese coffee. Fallon, in a heroic attempt to kowtow to his guest, claimed the film was getting critical praise, and found two nice comments about Affleck amongst the horde of negative reviews. But even Affleck wasn’t hearing it, and adopted what seems to be the movie’s new party line.

“Please, don’t scare people into thinking this is a critical film,” Affleck said. “We’re not going for the film critics’ circle. This is an audience movie. People actually like this movie.”

Affleck certainly doesn’t have to worry about one thing: No one is scared about Dawn of Justice being a critical film. Will “the people” actually like the film? Early returns don’t seem to be great there either, although the movie is bound to make a ton of money its first couple weeks in theaters.

What Affleck should probably worry about: The Justice League movie, the first of two parts, begins filming on April 11. Affleck, who was on a hot streak of critically acclaimed, Oscar-baity films, is now stuck with the DC universe for at least two more films.

DAWN OF JUSTICE Review; “A Movie Made By A Comic Book Fan For Comic Book Fans” loading

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Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is a movie full of firsts. It marks the first meeting between the Dark Knight and Man of Steel in live-action. It features Wonder Woman’s first big screen appearance. Most crucially, it’s Warner Bros’ first step in their newly launched DC Films Universe. Of course, Batman v Superman isn’t Zack Snyder’s first DC Comics movie, and after failing to perfectly stick the landing with Man of Steel, it’s been clear for a while that this one is make or break for both him and Warner Bros.’ future plans.

 

It’s a good job then Batman v Superman is perhaps Snyder’s best work to date. While the mythology the movie’s busy plot so fully embraces runs the risk of alienating those unfamiliar with the source material, the filmmaker still delivers the movie which Man of Steel should have been. With Chris Terrio’s witty and clever screenplay taking the place of what David Goyer did back in 2013, the director has finally found the right balance between story and action.

 

The latter is where Batman v Superman really excels, and while the final act does tend to go a little overboard with special effects as The Trinity unites to battle Doomsday, you’ll be so wrapped up in how high the stakes are at this stage that you honestly won’t care. Terrio does a solid job of quickly introducing us to all of the key players, but there’s so much going on that it sometimes feels like there just isn’t enough time for us to get to know them.

 

Despite Ben Affleck being the best big screen Bat to date, we never really get a feel of his world beyond Wayne Manor and Alfred. The same applies to Lex Luthor (a wonderfully diabolical Jesse Eisenberg) and Wonder Woman, though considering that the latter was only ever intended to have an extended cameo that can be understood, particularly when Gal Gadot delivers a star making performance. Superman meanwhile is still Superman, and seeing as Zack Snyder already perfected that hero in Man of Steel, it’s understandable that we don’t get a lot of significant changes here.

 

That too is somewhat problematic of course; character development is not a priority in Batman v Superman. The leads have their own respective story arcs, but none of them get a lot of room to breath, and it feels like we’re seeing just a snapshot of these character’s lives.To read the rest of my review and to find out what rating Batman v Superman gets, click NEXT

DAWN OF JUSTICE Review; “A Movie Made By A Comic Book Fan For Comic Book Fans”

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Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is a movie full of firsts. It marks the first meeting between the Dark Knight and Man of Steel in live-action. It features Wonder Woman’s first big screen appearance. Most crucially, it’s Warner Bros’ first step in their newly launched DC Films Universe. Of course, Batman v Superman isn’t Zack Snyder’s first DC Comics movie, and after failing to perfectly stick the landing with Man of Steel, it’s been clear for a while that this one is make or break for both him and Warner Bros.’ future plans.

It’s a good job then Batman v Superman is perhaps Snyder’s best work to date. While the mythology the movie’s busy plot so fully embraces runs the risk of alienating those unfamiliar with the source material, the filmmaker still delivers the movie which Man of Steel should have been. With Chris Terrio’s witty and clever screenplay taking the place of what David Goyer did back in 2013, the director has finally found the right balance between story and action.

The latter is where Batman v Superman really excels, and while the final act does tend to go a little overboard with special effects as The Trinity unites to battle Doomsday, you’ll be so wrapped up in how high the stakes are at this stage that you honestly won’t care. Terrio does a solid job of quickly introducing us to all of the key players, but there’s so much going on that it sometimes feels like there just isn’t enough time for us to get to know them.

Despite Ben Affleck being the best big screen Bat to date, we never really get a feel of his world beyond Wayne Manor and Alfred. The same applies to Lex Luthor (a wonderfully diabolical Jesse Eisenberg) and Wonder Woman, though considering that the latter was only ever intended to have an extended cameo that can be understood, particularly when Gal Gadot delivers a star making performance. Superman meanwhile is still Superman, and seeing as Zack Snyder already perfected that hero in Man of Steel, it’s understandable that we don’t get a lot of significant changes here.

That too is somewhat problematic of course; character development is not a priority in Batman v Superman. The leads have their own respective story arcs, but none of them get a lot of room to breath, and it feels like we’re seeing just a snapshot of these character’s lives.To read the rest of my review and to find out what rating Batman v Superman gets, click NEXT

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However, material like that is what solo movies are made for and no one seems to mind that being the case in The Avengers franchise; there’s certainly nothing here as forced as Bruce and Natasha’s sudden romance in Age of Ultron. Instead, we’re treated to plenty of much smaller character moments, whether it’s Bruce and Alfred’s bickering or seeing the love Superman has for humanity which cruelly isn’t being returned thanks, in part to Lex – a bad guy miles ahead of the throwaway villains who have dominated other franchises.

Those are issues unlikely to bother moviegoers who come to this one wanting to see what the title promises. The battle between Batman and Superman is superb, and is guaranteed to go down as one of the greatest ever sequences put in a comic book movie. It’s exciting from start to finish and a glorious sight to behold in IMAX.
Snyder also delivers on the promise of the subtitle, and while this movie could have got by without that (don’t expect to see the Justice League assemble just yet), this is the kind of material comic book fans will love. That’s what Batman v Superman ultimately is; a movie made by a comic book fan for comic book fans.

It may not have the smarts of Captain America: The Winter Soldier and it lacks the laughs of Guardians of the Galaxy, but Batman v Superman delivers a very different type of comic book movie, and that’s no bad thing these days. While it may not be to everyone’s tastes (believe me, there’s plenty here for fans of the source material to spend the next year bickering about), Marvel finally has some serious competition with this awesome start to the DC Films Universe.

An action-packed and epic start to the DC Films Universe, Batman v Superman will have you grinning from ear to ear from start to finish. The rest of 2016’s comic book movies will have a hard time topping this.loading

DISCLAIMER: ComicBookMovie.com is protected from liability under the DMCA (Digital Millenium Copyright Act) and “Safe Harbor” provisions. This post was submitted by a volunteer contributor who has agreed to our Code of Conduct. CBM will disable users who knowingly commit plagiarism, piracy, trademark or copyright infringement. Please contact us for expeditious removal of copyrighted/trademarked content. Learn more about our copyright and trademark policies HERE.[LESS]

 

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However, material like that is what solo movies are made for and no one seems to mind that being the case in The Avengers franchise; there’s certainly nothing here as forced as Bruce and Natasha’s sudden romance in Age of Ultron. Instead, we’re treated to plenty of much smaller character moments, whether it’s Bruce and Alfred’s bickering or seeing the love Superman has for humanity which cruelly isn’t being returned thanks, in part to Lex – a bad guy miles ahead of the throwaway villains who have dominated other franchises.

 

Those are issues unlikely to bother moviegoers who come to this one wanting to see what the title promises. The battle between Batman and Superman is superb, and is guaranteed to go down as one of the greatest ever sequences put in a comic book movie. It’s exciting from start to finish and a glorious sight to behold in IMAX.
Snyder also delivers on the promise of the subtitle, and while this movie could have got by without that (don’t expect to see the Justice League assemble just yet), this is the kind of material comic book fans will love. That’s what Batman v Superman ultimately is; a movie made by a comic book fan for comic book fans.

 

It may not have the smarts of Captain America: The Winter Soldier and it lacks the laughs of Guardians of the Galaxy, but Batman v Superman delivers a very different type of comic book movie, and that’s no bad thing these days. While it may not be to everyone’s tastes (believe me, there’s plenty here for fans of the source material to spend the next year bickering about), Marvel finally has some serious competition with this awesome start to the DC Films Universe.

 

An action-packed and epic start to the DC Films Universe, Batman v Superman will have you grinning from ear to ear from start to finish. The rest of 2016’s comic book movies will have a hard time topping this.loading

 

 

DISCLAIMER: ComicBookMovie.com is protected from liability under the DMCA (Digital Millenium Copyright Act) and “Safe Harbor” provisions. This post was submitted by a volunteer contributor who has agreed to our Code of Conduct. CBM will disable users who knowingly commit plagiarism, piracy, trademark or copyright infringement. Please contact us for expeditious removal of copyrighted/trademarked content. Learn more about our copyright and trademark policies HERE.[LESS]

Ben Affleck Calls “Batman v Superman” ‘an Audience Movie,’ Says It’s Not ‘a Critical Film’

During an appearance on “The Tonight Show,” Batman himself Ben Affleck discussed why “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice” shouldn’t be considered a critical film.

“This is definitely the kind of movie to see — a big event movie, huge crowds!” he enthused. “It’s a lot of fun. It’s a big, exciting, fun, explosive movie.”

RELATED: Snyder, “Batman v Superman” Cast Defend Film Against Negative Reviews

“Don’t scare people into thinking this is a critical film,” he added. “We’re not going for the film critic circle. This is an audience movie. People actually like this movie.”

Why is Superman still so popular? | Culture

A movie trailer for this year’s eagerly awaited update of the Superman story contains a moment which appears to subvert one of the most famous characters in the American cultural landscape. At first the trailer recounts the familiar story of a child from a distant planet, raised by farmers in Kansas who seek to keep his powers secret and call him by the human name of Clark Kent.

But after saving a bus full of schoolmates from drowning, a traumatised teenage Clark confronts his stepfather, who is worried he has revealed his true nature. “What was I supposed to do? Just let them die?” Clark asks. His father replies: “Maybe.”

It is a shocking piece of moral ambiguity in the Superman universe, where what is right and wrong have traditionally been clear. Along with a mournful soundtrack and arty shots, it is the strongest hint yet that the Superman of 2013, played by British actor Henry Cavill, is going to be rather different.

Since his first appearance in Action Comics in 1938, Superman has adapted to changing times. After the second world war broke out, he changed his slogan from fighting for “truth and justice” to fighting for “truth, justice and the American way”. That continued during the 1950s, when he became a symbol of muscular American patriotism which could do no wrong.

But as the nation grappled with the turmoil of the 1970s and embraced a more diverse culture, Christopher Reeve gave Superman more human qualities. In Richard Donner’s 1978 film version of the comic book saga, self-sacrifice suddenly became part of Superman’s appeal.

That continued through to the 2006 movie starring Brandon Routh when, with an evangelical Christian in the White House and much talk of the war on terror being a conflict with Islam, Superman was depicted almost as a Christ-like figure. Even as recently as this year, the latest DC Comics story had Superman pack in his newspaper job to start a blog.

“Superman changes with remarkable rapidity and yet manages to paradoxically project an idea of unchanging virtue,” said Professor Benjamin Saunders of the University of Oregon, author of an academic study of superheroes called Do The Gods Wear Capes?

So what will the Superman of 2013 look like? Even with the familiar tropes of a Kansas childhood and the Clark Kent alter ego, he is likely to reflect our modern world, which is uncertain and fearful of collapse, whether economic, political or environmental.

By seeking to reflect these troubled times Zack Snyder, who is directing the new film, called Man of Steel and scheduled for release in June, will be tinkering with one of the most powerful fictional figures of the 20th century. Fans often like to debate which superhero might beat another in a fight, but in the realm of image-marketing there is no doubt – Superman wins every time. “He is the first global superhero,” said Larry Tye, author of Superman: The High-Flying History of America’s Most Enduring Hero.

Indeed, Superman’s influence is so great that he is spearheading the growing academic study of comic heroes and their role in society. Such figures are seen as fulfilling the same societal function as the myths of ancient Greece or Rome. They are outlandish creatures doing battle for high ideals and teaching us moral lessons. “We need myths to teach us virtues. Eventually those virtues need to be embodied by a person. Mythology has always played that function,” said Professor Harry Brod, a philosopher at the University of Northern Iowa.

Some have taken the point of the moral teachings of Superman stories further, seeing a powerful philosophical concept behind them. In his book Saunders devotes a chapter to Superman, in which he suggests that the character’s immense popularity is a result of his embodiment of goodness. “In terms of 20th-century popular culture, he captures the notion of a Platonic ideal of the good. When Superman is done well, I am not embarrassed to call him a beautiful idea,” Saunders said.

Other experts in how human cultures work go even further in their efforts to explain the extraordinary longevity of the Superman figure.

The 2006 film that made Superman into a Jesus Christ-like figure was perhaps closer to the core of Superman than any other depiction. Just take some of Superman’s main attributes. He descends to Earth from a world far away up in the sky. His true father passes him advice as he walks among mere humans.

Except if you think he is Moses. With a slight change of emphasis, one can look at Superman’s origin story and see an orphan from a people whose home world has been destroyed. He is raised by an adoptive family as one of their own, while hiding his true identity. It is not much of a leap to see the story of Jewish exile in Egypt there.

In fact, the Jewish origins of Superman have sparked immense interest. The original comic book character’s creators, Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel, were both Jewish. Brod has written a book,Superman is Jewish? that traces Jewish themes in the story. Some are religious, like the Moses parallels, but others are based in more contemporary views of modern Jewishness. For example, Superman is an outsider in the world in which he finds himself. He is literally an alien. His alter ego Clark Kent is a geek, hiding behind glasses and posing as an intellectual rather than a physical hero.

In putting Superman in such clothes, Brod sees a Jewish male fantasy playing out – but one that resonates with mere mortals everywhere. “Clark Kent is timid. He is a Jewish nerd. He is weak and cowardly,” Brod said. “But then … little do you know! Beneath that exterior is the power of Superman. Everybody can relate to that, but I believe it is amplified by the Jewish experience.”

But it is probably unwise to assign Superman’s popularity to any one ethnicity. For though he is so often seen as American, he has largely expanded beyond that now.

When Tye was researching his book, he put out a call for stories about Superman. He wanted people to tell him what he meant to them. He had expected most responses to come from America. But they did not. “They came from Europe and from Africa. From everywhere,” Tye said.

In the end, perhaps it does not matter how Snyder directs Man of Steel in 2013. He can take Superman in a darker direction, he can bring out a movie more suited to the arthouse cinemas than the multiplexes. He can make him represent the ominous and confusing world of 2013. But in the end the more he changes the more Superman stays the same.

For Superman is not just some sort of unique being flying high above us. In the projection of our desires, hopes and fears, Superman is us.